Workshop Organisers

Mr Daniel Herron (dherron@dundee.ac.uk) is a joint PhD student at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design at the University of Dundee, and at the Faculty of Engineering and IT at the University of Technology Sydney. His research interests lie in designing technology that can positively impact life experiences. His doctoral research explores what happens when a romantic relationship comes to an end in a digital context, with a specific focus on how individuals interact with digital possessions from a past relationship. He aims to generate methods of supporting individuals experiencing this type of life transition.
Website: www.danielherron.co.uk

Ms Nazanin Andalibi (naz@drexel.edu) is a PhD candidate at the College of Computing and Informatics at Drexel University. Her research focuses on people’s social media disclosure and social support practices in stigmatized contexts. She has also reflected on her experience as a researcher in sensitive contexts and argues that it is important for the HCI community to consider researchers’ occupational vulnerability in discussions, trainings, practices, and policies around research ethics. Her aim is to expand our theoretical understanding of human behavior, tell stories of stigmatized populations, and improve the design of social computing systems to better support sensitive disclosures and positive outcomes.
Website: www.nazaninandalibi.net

Mr Oliver Haimson (ohaimson@uci.edu) is a PhD Candidate in the Informatics Department at UC Irvine. His research focuses on how people represent changing and faceted identities on social media during life transitions. In particular, he studies transgender people’s experiences with self-presentation and disclosure as they change gender on social network sites. Through his research, he hopes to impact technological inclusion of marginalized users.
Website: www.oliverhaimson.com

Dr Wendy Moncur, FRSA (wmoncur@dundee.ac.uk) is a Reader in Socio-Digital Interaction at the University of Dundee. She is also a Visiting Scholar at the University of Technology Sydney, Australia, and an Associate of the Centre for Death and Society (University of Bath). Her interdisciplinary research focuses on being human in a Digital Age, and is grounded in HCI. She has examined the design and use of technology in contemporary experiences, including becoming a parent, relationship breakdown, retiral and end of life. She also examines methodological issues around the conduct of research in sensitive contexts, and opportunities for research to illuminate policy.
Website: www.wendymoncur.com

Professor Dr Elise van den Hoven MTD (Elise.VandenHoven@uts.edu.au) is a Professor of Human-Computer Interaction in the School of Software at University of Technology Sydney and a part-time associate professor in the Department of Industrial Design, Eindhoven University of Technology. She has two honorary appointments: honorary senior research fellow in Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design, University of Dundee, and associate investigator with the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders. Her research interests span different disciplines, including human-computer interaction, design and psychology, including people-centered design, designing interactive systems, physical interaction, and supporting human remembering.
Website: www.elisevandenhoven.com

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